SCOTUS: ‘faithless electors’ can’t go rogue at Electoral College; upholds a 1991 law that bars robocalls to cellphones.

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The 538 people who cast the actual votes for president in December as part of the Electoral College are not free agents and must vote as the laws of their states direct, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The unanimous decision in the “faithless elector” case was a defeat for advocates of changing the Electoral College, who hoped a win would force a shift in the method of electing presidents toward a nationwide popular vote. But it was a win for state election officials who feared that empowering rogue electors would cause chaos.

The November general election is not actually a direct vote for the presidential candidates. Voters instead choose a slate of electors appointed in their states by the political parties. Those electors meet in December to cast their ballots, which are counted during a joint session of Congress in January.

NBC:

Supreme Court upholds cellphone robocall ban:

The Supreme Court on Monday upheld a 1991 law that bars robocalls to cellphones.

Political consultants and pollsters were among those asking the Supreme Court to strike down the 1991 law that bars them from making robocalls to cellphones as a violation of their free speech rights under the Constitution. The issue was whether, by allowing one kind of speech but not others, the exception made the whole law unconstitutional.

The court threw out the exception for government-debt collection and preserved the broader prohibition.

Ms. G

Any Adult in the Room-2020.