Steve Mnuchin: It ‘wouldn’t be fair’ to use ‘taxpayer dollars to pay more people to sit home’

Steve Mnuchin and most of the GOP obviously do not like the $600 bump in unemployment relief Congress passed in the last Coronavirus relief package that is set to expire next week. When asked about it on his way to Capitol Hill, Mnuchin replied, “It ‘wouldn’t be fair’ to use ‘taxpayer dollars to pay more people to sit home.”

***Note to the Craven, Drooling Douchebag Steve Mnuchin: The unemployed ARE taxpayers. In fact, we tax unemployment insurance, including the bump the federal government provided. DERP!

The unemployment benefits are slated to expire at the end of the month, even as the nation deals with a jobless rate of 11.1 percent. Democrats want to extend the plus-up in the new bill, arguing it will cause more damage to end them or limit them. 

The White House and Senate GOP have struggled to reach a deal on a package because of various differences, including the inclusion of a payroll tax cut demanded by

The Hill:

Mnuchin then went on Fox ‘News’ and attempted to blame the Democratic Party for failure to grant Trump his cherished payroll tax cut. Chris Wallace reminded Mnuchin that several leading Senate Republicans also opposed the payroll tax cut including, including  John Thune, John Cornyn, and Chuck Grassley. Mnuchin responded, “there were other Republicans that supported it.”

Watch the entire interview below:

30 million

That’s how many people are currently receiving government unemployment benefits—about 20% of American workers. 

1.4 million

That’s how many people filed for temporary unemployment benefits last week. 

975,000

That’s how many people submitted claims to the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program.

6.9 million

That’s the highest ever number of weekly claims ever recorded, from late March.

4.1 million

That’s how many Americans lost jobs between the first and second weeks in July.

4.1 million

That’s how many Americans lost jobs between the first and second weeks in July.

47%

That’s the portion of Americans in households that have experienced pandemic-related job losses who believe that those jobs are unlikely to come back.

11.1%

That was the unemployment rate in June—slightly lower than the eye-watering 14.7% rate the United States saw in April.

Forbes:

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